Truths and Myths About Gluten

The Popular Myths and the Plain Truths about Gluten

There are varying debates about the benefits and risks of gluten. Some of them are just myths while others are factual.

A closer look at your local grocery outlets will confirm that most people are avoiding gluten. The main reason is mostly because the wheat-derived protein is being blamed for diverse issues such as weight gain and weakened bones. An overwhelming number of people believe that a gluten-free diet improves health. Basically, there are a lot of misinformation and confusion surrounding gluten. The following are the common myths and the actual truth regarding gluten.

Sponsored Listings Gluten-Free

Myth:

A diet free from gluten is much healthier than others

Truth:

Industrial gluten-free products normally contain more fat, sugar, and salt to compensate for gluten. Normal bread is fortified with essential vitamins and iron gluten-free foods are normally unlike gluten foods.

Myth:

Gluten or wheat allergies are as a result of genetically modified wheat

Truth:

Unlike soybeans and corn, there are no genetically modified wheat products that commercially exist in the U.S.

Myth:

Whole-wheat bread contains less gluten than white bread

Truth:

By withholding pockets of air in dough, gluten promotes bread rise. Industrial whole-wheat bread can be laced with gluten since the whole-wheat flour is weightier than the white.

Myth:

Barley and rye also have gluten

Truth:

Barley and rye have proteins comparable to those contained in gluten and hence, they should be avoided by people with celiac disease. However, they do not actually have the class of protein contained in wheat.

Bottom line

Claiming to have gluten intolerance to try to lose weight, and not because you have celiac disease or have wheat allergy, can lead to several problems. Always check product labels for levels of fat, sugar and salt. Also, do a mid-aisle examination with fortified breads prepared from wheat. If you have been avoiding white bread for wheat bread, your weight gain could have been resulted from the extra fiber and whole grains. Whole grains do not mean less gluten. Actually, some whole-wheat bread contains more gluten than the white bread. You should know that going gluten free without clearly considering its effects on the body is not actually beneficial and can probably derail you weight loss mission. The uninformed propagandas against certain types of food have been there before. In fact, it happens virtually in every decade. In the 1990s, fat was at the receiving end. Today it is gluten and tomorrow it will be something else. You can actually have a very healthy gluten-free diet. However, this does not mean that your diet should be free from gluten to be healthy. If you exhibit early signs of celiac disease, consult to your doctor for a professional diagnosis and advice. Otherwise, if you are fighting your weight, consider other efficient strategies instead.

Popular Searches