Diabetes Foot Problems

Symptoms and treatment of diabetes foot problems

Diabetes is a relatively common disease, but many people aren't aware of the associated conditions that can develop as a result of it. Among the most common of these are diabetes foot problems, which encompass a number of different conditions both minor and serious.

Many diabetes sufferers either don't notice or don't treat their foot conditions, thinking that they are simply a symptom of their disease that will pass in time. This attitude can be dangerous, however, as even the most minor foot problems can become serious if left untreated. It's best to report all symptoms to a doctor who is aware of your diabetic history.

Diabetes Foot Problem Symptoms

Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes can present with a number of symptoms, including fatigue, blurred vision, unusual hunger and a frequent need to urinate. The lesser-known symptoms (or more aptly, complications) are the following diabetes feet problems:

Diabetes Foot Problem Treatment

Treatment of diabetes foot problems will depend on the particular condition, but all symptoms of foot problems should be reported to a doctor as soon as possible, to help limit the damage and establish a treatment plan.

Early treatment for Charcot foot is especially critical, to limit the deterioration of the joints. Doctors will use X-rays to determine the severity of the condition, and then may use surgical or non-surgical measures to treat it. Non-surgical measures include special shoes and braces, modified activity and stabilizing and immobilizing the foot for a period of time.

Treatment of foot ulcers, depending on the severity, may include removing dead tissue and cleansing the wound, having the patient stay off the foot completely until healed, and applying medications to prevent infection.

Treatment of swollen feet may include a combination of dietary changes, orthotics and elevation of the feet. Your doctor can assess the severity of the swelling, and recommend a treatment plan.